LionSteel Drops New Multifunctional, Modern Traditional Knife

LionSteel is expanding its suite of modern traditionals with the Jack series. The pattern is available in three different configurations, each with an added functional element.

The basic format underlying the trio of Jack models is that of a (no surprise here) jackknife. Its clip point blade runs to 3.03 inches in length, so users will have plenty of real estate for the classical suite of EDC tasks: opening boxes, slicing up apples, whittling, carving your name in a tree, etc. The blade opens with the same French cut-style nail mark that LionSteel implemented on some of the Jack’s stablemates, like the bestMAN and Barlow models.

Another LionSteel trope is in play on the Jack, and that’s the blade steel: the Maniago maker chose M390 for this one, which gives the Jack very modern levels of edge retention and corrosion resistance alongside its classic design cues. Another departure from tradition comes in the fact that the Jack’s single bolster handle is screwed, rather than pinned, together; thus users are able to disassemble their knife for maintenance or tinkering as they would any other modern folder.

In terms of options, there is of course the expected gamut of handle scale options: carbon fiber, green canvas Micarta, black G-10, Santos or olive wood. But the bigger choice potential buyers will have to make is which additional tools, if any, they want on their Jack. You can choose to keep it simple, with no extra implements; add in a bottle opener-combination-screwdriver arm that opens from the same side as the blade; or go all the way and also get a corkscrew arm on the off-side scale.

A canvas Micarta Jack with all the fixings

No matter which configuration you choose, the Jack is a lightweight knife; with the blade by itself it comes in at 1.87 oz.; 2.36 oz. with the screwdriver added; and 2.79 oz. with all three tools.

The Jack is available now from LionSteel.

Knife in Featured Image: LionSteel Jack

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